British Farming | What Lambing Looks Like on a UK Farm

Rufus Denne. Happiest when busiest. Grew up on a farm in the countryside, and now growing a business in the big city. I love design, tech and marketing. Question? Hate Mail? Fire it over - [email protected]

Happy Easter everyone! It’s time to set aside a few moments for me to reflect on another month spent looking into British Farming.

Topically, this month we took a deep dive into something synonymous with this time of year – LAMBING.

The day

It was one of the most taxing days so far, we left London at 4am to make it in time for mum to get up and do the early checks on the expecting sheep and the day rolled on from there. It was hard work, but a total success. Lots of lambs were born, and we left the farm in the knowledge they were all happy + healthy.

Something that really surprised me, was the sheer amount of time you spend on call. A lot of the sheep can lamb themselves (and do), but there were quite a few instances in which we needed to intervene and it really had me thinking about how much the animals rely on the farmers – for not only a home, but for their health.

It turns out lambs are oddly vulnerable to predators too – foxes and badgers specifically. They target the weak and it’s important to keep a close eye on – not only the pregnant sheep, but also the smaller lambs too. And with over 100 to look at, that’s no simple task.

Anyway, I’m blabbering on – and I think it probably best to let you watch. By all means reach out if you have any questions for me, I’ll be sure to answer.

Oh, and if you missed last months, then be sure to watch February’s British Farming Experience.

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